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Coping crown moulding

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Topic by rickf16 posted 07-24-2012 09:39 PM 2593 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rickf16

5 posts in 2462 days

07-24-2012 09:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question trick

I have to make two cope cuts in crown I will be putting up. I know there is a jig for this, but I don’t want to spend 50.00 bucks on something I won’t use again. I know it can be done without the jig, but how? What is the angle and how should I proceed? I do own a coping saw. Any help is greatly appreciated.



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MarkTheFiddler

447 posts in 2371 days

07-24-2012 11:41 PM

Rick,

I’m sorry I can’t get to youtube from work so I can’t find a link for you. However, I found a video about coping with a dremel. Although I was coping base boards, they had quite a detailed profile. I did have to buy a cutting bit for $19 but I’m going to use it for many things.

Bear in mind that I never tried ANY coping before this in my life and I ended up with 4 corners that look like this. I hope this helps and good luck!

-- Working on my home for 2 years and counting.

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GaryL

206 posts in 2935 days

07-25-2012 12:28 AM

The most important step in installing crown besides doing a quality cope is making sure the crown that is butting into the corner is set on the correct angle (spring angle). If this piece is not set right your cope will not nest into it correctly. I cut a 16” pc with a cope on both ends to set the butt corners to be sure that my copes will fit properly.
Crown is definitely one of the toughest items to cope. You have to consider the angle as you’re back cutting your cope cut.
Just be sure to some extra to practice with and you’ll be whipping them out in no time.

-- The difference between a pro and an amateur, an amateur points out his mistakes

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MarkTheFiddler

447 posts in 2371 days

07-25-2012 01:21 AM

Gary is the man. If he says something different than me, go with his advice.

-- Working on my home for 2 years and counting.

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Dan Lyke

331 posts in 3908 days

07-26-2012 08:54 PM

I’ve got a relatively simple baseboard profile, but I’ve done inside corners by cutting a diagonal so that the back of the trim is the full length plus just a hair, and the front of the trim is shorter. Then take the coping saw and cut that diagonal face straight back (or even a little back-beveled) down the line where the pattern of the face of the moulding hits that diagonal bevel.

This gives you an edge that matches the face of the other piece. If you cut a bit of a back bevel, then when you force it into place you crunch those wood fibers a bit and get a really tight seam.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/

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GaryL

206 posts in 2935 days

07-27-2012 01:32 AM

Dan’s coping description is right on the money. Cut a miter/bevel at a 45 degree and use that edge on the front for your cut line with a back bevel.

-- The difference between a pro and an amateur, an amateur points out his mistakes

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MoshupTrail

40 posts in 2366 days

07-30-2012 12:25 AM

I don’t understand. When is coping required and when can you simply miter?
I’ve put up a lot of crown and never had to cope. The secret I’ve found with any kind of crown is to observe the spring angle when mitering. But that’s it. When I recently removed a bunch of base board, I found all the corners had been coped. Why?

-- Measure twice, cut once.

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GaryL

206 posts in 2935 days

07-30-2012 12:57 AM

Coping is more forgiving to seasonal movements. With mitered corners if the pieces shrink in the winter the joint will have a gap. With a properly sprung cope it not open up, hopefully. Also with prestained or prefinished trim a cope is easier to get a tight joint than relying on a perfect miter in a perfect 90 deg. corner. A coped corner does not have to be a perfect 90. Try to miter a 7 7/8” crown and you’ll find it is near impossible.
Of course this is assuming your shooting for a nice corner that does not need a ton of caulk to look good and there is no caulking stain grade.

-- The difference between a pro and an amateur, an amateur points out his mistakes

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MoshupTrail

40 posts in 2366 days

07-31-2012 02:21 AM

okay, I see. thanks. All the work I’ve done has been painted, and a little painter’s calk covers a multitude of sins :)

-- Measure twice, cut once.

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Dan Lyke

331 posts in 3908 days

07-31-2012 02:51 AM

Grin. Yeah, applying liquid trim is different when your standards are more along the lines of “things you can fill with cyanoacrylate and 220 grit sandpaper”...

(And I just went through [mumbledy mumble] containers of caulk finishing up my workshop, so I know from liquid trim…)

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/

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rickf16

5 posts in 2462 days

07-31-2012 03:10 PM

Thanks for the help. I just started putting up the crown and I am mitering these, and yes …calk does cover a “multitude of sins”. What I’m putting up now is white, so calking will have to do. The gaps are very manageable though. The cope cuts are going up against a piece that I thought I wouldn’t need to miter. Dan, I will try your method on some scrap to get it right. Gary, I did not know that crown has three different spring angles. Mine is 38. I do know this…I hope to NEVER have to deal with crown again. It is a giant pain.

Thanks again for the advice

Rick

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GaryL

206 posts in 2935 days

08-01-2012 01:05 AM

38 deg. is probably the most common spring angle but 45 pops up now and then. There are always the ones that come along that are some weird 39 1/2 or 41 or someother odd angle. Just depends on the mill and the grind of their knifes. Because if this the compound miter cut guides on some miter saws will not work.

-- The difference between a pro and an amateur, an amateur points out his mistakes

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rickf16

5 posts in 2462 days

09-01-2012 09:33 PM

Just a note…the crown is up and the copes came out okay. They ain’t perfect, but the wife likes it. This kitchen remodel has been a job. More than I asked for. It was this or a camper…shoulda got the camper:)

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MarkTheFiddler

447 posts in 2371 days

09-01-2012 11:45 PM

Congrats on the kitchen and the coping! Yours is a camper, mine is a 60 inch wide screen. I can’t wait for my old 32 inch television to go bad. ;)

-- Working on my home for 2 years and counting.

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bojapally1

2 posts in 702 days

01-13-2017 05:56 AM

Congrats on the kitchen and the coping! Yours is a camper, mine is a 60 inch wide screen. I can’t wait for my old 32 inch television to go bad. ;)bigo live live broadcastingCongrats on the kitchen and the coping! Yours is a camper, mine is a 60 inch wide screen. I can’t wait for my old 32 inch television to go bad. ;)

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bestofkodiaddons

1 post in 246 days

04-14-2018 06:38 AM

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