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Topic by Jimi_C posted 02-16-2010 06:20 AM 8858 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jimi_C

9 posts in 3248 days

02-16-2010 06:20 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plumbing parts plumbing

So I went to install my new shower/bath fixture tonight, and ran into several problems – namely compression fittings. I soldered everything into place only to have the hot side’s compression fitting (the part attached to the soldered pipe, of course) start leaking. I ended up taking that out, redoing the compression fittings with fresh teflon tape, and soldering it all back into place – only to have the cold side compression fitting start leaking…

So, being a bit tired and sick of messing with it, I capped off the cold side and I’ll redo the cold side tomorrow. I really don’t know what I did wrong, I used plenty of teflon tape, wrapped it in the right direction, and tightened it down as much as I could. The hot side seems to be holding, but I’ve been checking it every hour for leaks… I’m not going to sleep well tonight I think.

Now, my question is: Can I clean up the incoming pipe and re-use it without cutting it down? I only have about 4 inches left above the floor, and I had been cutting off pipe to use fresh copper, but I don’t really want to go down too much further. I had this all ready to go once, only to find out that my wall was quite a bit thicker than I thought, and had to order a deep rough kit. So, I capped it off that time, and cut the caps off to do the work tonight. I’m going to have to take the cap off the cold side, and I’d prefer not to have to cut yet another inch off that pipe in order to get to usable copper.

If I can reuse it, should I use a solder sucker for this? Or is it good enough to heat up the old solder, wipe off as much as I can, and then sand the pipe down as much as possible? I read on one site that this essentially leaves a “tinned” surface that will create a bond just fine, but I thought I’d ask.



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Jimi_C

9 posts in 3248 days

02-16-2010 06:25 AM

The other really annoying part of the night was the fact that I cut the pipe for the nozzle to the exact length specified in the rough-out diagram and when screwed all the way down, the nozzle is at least 1/4” away from the wall. Does that rough-out diagram not account for tile or other material on the wall? I need to go re-read the instructions…

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Wdwrkng

5 posts in 3101 days

03-25-2010 01:24 AM

I guess I’m confused why you are soldering compression fittings? Maybe I just don’t understand what you are doing. Can you explain better. I have done plenty of this type of work so I should be able to help you. You should solder your copper fittings or pipe on then attach the compression fittings or the heat can damage them.

-- I'm a woodworking enthusiast---http://www.woodworkerplans.com/reviews/woodworking4home-review/

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Jimi_C

9 posts in 3248 days

03-25-2010 02:09 AM

A bit late, had this done about a month now :)

I wasn’t soldering the compression fittings – I assembled the new bath fitting with the compression fittings screwed into place, and then soldered the connecting pipes together. After turning on the water, the compression fittings leaked, so I had to de-solder things to re-tighten them.

Here’s the completed setup:

I got a little lazy after having to do it twice (cold side leaked, de-soldered that, fixed, turned water on and the hot side leaked…), thus the double joint on the hot side (on the left in the picture).

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Wdwrkng

5 posts in 3101 days

03-25-2010 02:45 AM

I take it’s not leaking? That should work fine but I wouldn’t have used the compression fittings. I would have worked backwards from the top. I would have cut my copper pipes down about a foot. Then I would have soldered on male fittings to my copper pipes. Then screwed the copper pipes with the male fittings attached into the diverter valve until tight and then soldered the the pipes back together at the bottom. Thus no compressions to worry about. Plumbing can be tricky. Hopefully that makes sense.

-- I'm a woodworking enthusiast---http://www.woodworkerplans.com/reviews/woodworking4home-review/

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Jimi_C

9 posts in 3248 days

03-25-2010 02:52 AM

Yep it’s been good for over a month, so it probably won’t start leaking now. But yeah, 6 one way, half a dozen the other… It wasn’t the compression part that was leaking, it was the male end screwed into the compression fitting, so had I just screwed the male fitting into the diverter I probably would have had the same thing happen. I’ve since learned to just crank on that sucker till it won’t budge, then it’s probably tight enough :) I do prefer soldering though, so much simpler and hard to screw up. I think my joints look pretty good too, at least as good as some “pros” work I’ve seen in other homes.

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Wdwrkng

5 posts in 3101 days

03-25-2010 03:03 AM

Looks good and I don’t envy you working on an older lathe house. Very messy stuff! I’m not a big fan of soldering any more now that they have a lot of brass Sharkbite fittings and plastic fittings or rings that clamp down now out on the market. However, there are still times that call for solder.

-- I'm a woodworking enthusiast---http://www.woodworkerplans.com/reviews/woodworking4home-review/

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Jimi_C

9 posts in 3248 days

03-25-2010 03:16 AM

Hah! Ain’t that the truth… the simple act of hanging a picture is a nightmare. I can’t wait to sell this and get into a house with good old drywall for walls again.

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lovinmrv

4 posts in 3109 days

03-25-2010 01:36 PM

Have you folks seen the Shark Bite fittings? No soldering, no leaking, no kidding!

http://www.sharkbiteplumbing.com/?gclid=CIH__ozn06ACFSZo5Qod-j3pvw

http://riverleacape.blogspot.com/2006/08/sharkbite.html

PS, this is not a paid ad…

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Jimi_C

9 posts in 3248 days

03-25-2010 02:26 PM

@lovinmrv: Yeah I had seen them, but never used them, so I didn’t know what the dos and don’ts were. Would it have been ok to use these in the situation above? Can you go copper → PEX → copper without violating any codes? I would love to start using PEX and sharkbite whenever possible.

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Wdwrkng

5 posts in 3101 days

03-26-2010 02:40 AM

Yes you can use Shark bites in just about in any situation. Just had a new water softener system installed at my house and they used Shark Bites. My step daughter who lives in another state had her water heater without a shutoff valve on it. She called a plumber out and he installed a Shark Bite on it. My old man works in a plumbing warehouse and they sold them 5 yrs ago and I have used them ever since whenever I can. Just slip them on and your done. Best thing I have ever seen. Always go Shark Bite if you can find em. They have been okay-ed by national codes from what I have heard.

-- I'm a woodworking enthusiast---http://www.woodworkerplans.com/reviews/woodworking4home-review/

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lovinmrv

4 posts in 3109 days

03-26-2010 09:39 AM

Jimi,

I have no idea about codes. My first introduction to them was at my Church. We had a leaky joint that had been cobbled together over the years. I could not keep water from seeping to the joint, preventing me from getting the joint to seal. Enter Shark Bite. I snapped it into place and voila! no more leak…..amazing!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lovinmrv/4463678471/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lovinmrv/4463674821/in/photostream/

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SawdustJunky

20 posts in 3095 days

03-30-2010 08:06 PM

Shark or Gator bites work great in the app.

-- ... In the end it is more about the memories we make than the pieces we build.

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Moorecuts

1 post in 299 days

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satta

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