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Spring Maintenance for Deck

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Topic by MsDebbieP posted 04-07-2008 12:01 AM 5543 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MsDebbieP

629 posts in 3861 days

04-07-2008 12:01 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question deck maintenance pressure treated

We have a deck made from pressure treated lumber and it’s time to give it a spring cleaning and what-not.

What products do people use /recommend for getting this ready to look great for another year?

-- ~ Debbie, Ontario Canada



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LeeJ

48 posts in 3848 days

04-07-2008 03:25 PM

Hi Ms. Debbie;

Most folks use a pressure washer to clean them. Home Depot and the like sell a detergent specifically for decks.

I’m not a big fan of blasting wood with a pressure washer, but that’s the way I’ve SEEN it done.

I never did it myself.

Hope this helps.

Lee

-- http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

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MsDebbieP

629 posts in 3861 days

04-07-2008 05:45 PM

thanks Lee
and then do you put any special preservative back on?
I’m sure there are pros and cons to everything.

-- ~ Debbie, Ontario Canada

View Dalec's profile

Dalec

40 posts in 3848 days

04-07-2008 09:17 PM

We have a trex deck that minimizes maintenance. After two full seasons, decided I better do something about the algae (mildew/mossy) type growth. I just mixed up a batch of bleach and water 1:6 solution, used a can sprayer let set for a few minutes, brushed with a old broom and sprayed down with water hose. Had to do it twice to get the deck looking like new.

I have used pressure washers on my old home deck and found places where the water pressure damaged the wood deck. So if you use a pressure washer, be very careful. The trex doesn’t need to be coated with a preservative. I did some research on wood preservatives for my old deck, but was never satisfied with the products I found that were supposed to be good. It seems pressure treated wood is pretty much bomb proof and would not necessarily need a preservative coating. I may be incorrect in this however.

Dalec

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MsDebbieP

629 posts in 3861 days

04-07-2008 09:41 PM

thanks

so pressure washing…

-- ~ Debbie, Ontario Canada

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Jcees

32 posts in 3847 days

04-07-2008 10:10 PM

Pressure treating renders the wood distasteful to bugs and resistant to mold and mildew. It still needs a finish to last. I’d clean the deck with a scrub brush and TSP. Hose it off and forgo the pressure washer. Let it dry for a few days before putting on any finish.

Thompson’s Water Seal is a paraffin based product that remains soft and therefore is probably one of the weakest finishes you can use outside. It’s easy to apply but you’ll have to do it more frequently.

Here in Florida you’d want to use an algaecide/mildewcide additive too. For maximum UV protection, you’ll need to use a pigment based stain or at least a semi-transparent pigment stain. Pay close attention to end grain and don’t be stingy with the material. FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS

Hope this helps.

always,
J.C.

P.S. Thanks for the kudos on my porch, MsDeb. Much obliged.

-- "Imagination is more important than knowledge" -- Albert Einstein

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MsDebbieP

629 posts in 3861 days

04-07-2008 10:27 PM

thanks :)

-- ~ Debbie, Ontario Canada

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normand

16 posts in 3844 days

04-07-2008 10:40 PM

T S P is fine for a small project and cleans well; but pressure washing is the best approach to something of any size, plus you can do a vinyl siding wash with the left overs, if you have vinyl.

An old neighbor of ours back in Ma. reclaimed a long neglected deck with seats etc., and the pressure washer did the trick with ease.

Jcees is right about Thompson, plus it is watery and weak; but McClusky and Olympic both manufacture a good product.
I have used both with excellent results. [ each will also except stain if you wish to even out some trouble spots ].

You should plan on re-doing the deck every couple of years to keep it safe and spanky.

Norm.

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tenontim

151 posts in 3847 days

04-08-2008 12:30 AM

Debbie, if you’re going to borrow or rent a pressure washer, try to get one of the smaller ones, and set the pressure just high enough to knock off the dirt and stuff. Try it on a less visible area, to make sure it doesn’t fuzz the wood up too much. Like Norm said, there are plenty of preservatives on the market. Thompson’s is not what it used to be, so ask at the paint or hardware store.

-- Tim

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MsDebbieP

629 posts in 3861 days

04-08-2008 12:52 AM

thanks everyone. That’s what I was looking for!

-- ~ Debbie, Ontario Canada

View Bob42's profile

Bob42

19 posts in 3843 days

04-08-2008 01:51 PM

Debbie,
I have had both pressure treated and composite decking for years. Home depot has cleaners that you spray on, wait a few minutes and then power wash off. The key is to brush in the solution lightly and do not let it dry. Only work in a 3-4’ area at a time. You will have to cover any shrubs or flowers when doing it but it comes out like a new deck. Keep the power washer about 8-10” away from the deck. I have some solution in my shed and will post later the name because the Depot has different kinds and I have found this works the best. I live on Long Island and use a semi transparent deck stain to finish the pressure treated deck. It lasts about 3 years.

-- Bob K. East Northport, NY

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MsDebbieP

629 posts in 3861 days

04-08-2008 02:01 PM

thank you Bob.

-- ~ Debbie, Ontario Canada

View Bob42's profile

Bob42

19 posts in 3843 days

04-08-2008 03:31 PM

Deb,
The product that Home Depot carries is Behr #62 Multi surface cleaner & mildew stain remover. Be careful that you get this number. Other numbers haven’t worked for me. When the decking needs replacement I suggest the solid composite. I put it on my pool deck and love it. When it gets warmer and I open the pool I’ll take some pictures and post them. I biscuit joined all the decking.

-- Bob K. East Northport, NY

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normand

16 posts in 3844 days

04-08-2008 03:34 PM

To pick up on Tenontim’s point, you would be well advised to check with a paint store or a good old fashioned hardware store, if you have access to the latter. and the clerks etc. that you find , generally know not only the brands, but the quality of each.

A knowledgeable clerk would probably warn you of applying a pre-mixed stain and repelling product, as these generally contain only about 1/3 rd of active repellent ingredients. I.e. you would be better off to add some stain to a product in the long run.

STAY- AWAY from home building supplies for this. Most of the help there are not really educated in their departments and products. [ not all….but most ].

Taking the advice from some ,reminds me of the builder that did not know ” STUFF ” – from putty, and all of his windows fell out !!

Example :

I visited two of these locally trying to find some Japan dryer to replenish my supply.
The [” associates ” ] at both had never heard of the product, let alone it’s use, even after telling them: and that,—in their own paint departments.

I think that they probably thought that I would be better off looking for it in home appliances, i.e. on top of the dryers ! [ Japan being an Island and all .]

Food for thought.
Norm.

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MsDebbieP

629 posts in 3861 days

04-08-2008 04:01 PM

that’s why I came here, Norm :)
to my TRUSTED advisors!

We do have a Home Hardware here. I’ll be checking it out.

-- ~ Debbie, Ontario Canada

View Dalec's profile

Dalec

40 posts in 3848 days

04-08-2008 04:28 PM

I second Norm’s impression of some associates in the big box stores.

I get consistently better advice from local hardware stores. The local hardware stores can’t compete with the big box stores for price, but can with better customer service and advice. Thank goodness for those few local hardware stores that remain.

Dalec

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normand

16 posts in 3844 days

04-08-2008 09:59 PM

Yea and amen to that dalec,

Even better if you are lucky to find a n old family run [ real hardware ] store, because they may still have items stored away in their cellars, reminiscent of ” catacombs ” , that date to the early 1900’s.

These are treasure troves indeed, especially when doing refurbishing, and it is great to find a vendor that really knows what they are talking about, instead of ” hoop-la ” !

Norm.

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Fredayi

5 posts in 558 days

04-05-2017 01:20 PM

Your info is useful for us.

Truck Racing Games

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bobryan

1 post in 445 days

07-28-2017 12:30 AM

As a deck contractor, I might be a bit biased ;) but I recommend a trex deck when you’re ready to replace your existing one. But for now, you may want to consider hiring a professional to clean. They’ll be able to advise you on proper deck maintenance in the future and will likely have the right types of cleaners to prevent wear and tear for the foreseeable future at least. Just my 2 cents… Bob | My Website

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