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Reclaiming Mahogany for Baseboards #1: Breaking down the beams

Blog entry by Dan Lyke posted 04-16-2008 05:07 PM 2252 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Reclaiming Mahogany for Baseboards series Part 2: Milling »

We picked up a bunch of Peruvian mahogany box beams off of Craigslist. They’ve been sitting in the attic, waiting for that task to come up on the queue. It did.

Ow, do my hands hurt, both from all the splinters and cuts, and from gripping the pliers to pull those nails.

There are a few nails in there yet, so I’m going to have to be very careful as I fire up the router, but left to be done is to select some of the thicker boards from the narrow stacks, cut them to 4” wide, plane them to 5/8” (just a hair), put a roundover on one side, and install them.

We’ll probably have to cut a few small rabbets, a few sections of the floor were repaired when it was refinished and the new wall gap isn’t as consistently 5/8” as it was, and I’ll set up a jig on the router table to cut the butt joint profiles for the inside corners. Outside corners will be miters.

(Mirrored from my personal site)

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/



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Dan Lyke

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8 comments so far

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MRTRIM

744 posts in 3875 days

posted 04-17-2008 03:28 AM

sounds like youll have some real pretty baseboard dan .

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Dan Lyke

331 posts in 3875 days

posted 04-17-2008 04:20 PM

Hoping for it! I’m a little nervous about cutting the cove fittings as I start to get things into shape, I’ve never done that before and I’m awful with a hand saw, but my only concern is that once we get these in we’ll feel the need to replace all the door and window trim in those rooms to the same standards…

It’s especially rough since we’ve got a beautiful front door slated to go in, and I’m probably going to end up tearing up the door trim, at least, to make that fit right.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/

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Bill

131 posts in 3875 days

posted 04-17-2008 05:14 PM

Sounds like an interesting job you have in store. A lot of work, but you will like the end results.

-- Bill - Turlock, Ca. - http://www.brookswoodworks.com

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MRTRIM

744 posts in 3875 days

posted 04-17-2008 10:42 PM

if its the inside corners your worried about i can certainly show you an easy way just let me know , id be glad to offer any advise

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Dan Lyke

331 posts in 3875 days

posted 04-17-2008 10:54 PM

Love to have any advice I can get! I’ve thought about two methods:

1. Cut the appropriate miter on one of the boards at the junction, then follow up with a coping saw to cut the profile.

2. Cut the appropriate miter, and then because the profile is straight with a 3/8” radius curve, use a ¾” router bit and a jig on the router table to trim away the portions that the straight side hides behind.

#1 scares me because I’m absolutely horrible with hand saws. #2 scares me because of end-grain chipout possibilities.

So I’ll probably go with #1, go very slowly, and probably cut wide and finish up with a rasp or file.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/

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MRTRIM

744 posts in 3875 days

posted 04-17-2008 11:14 PM

ok dan , your best to go with # 1 . dont be scared of a coping saw . do 2 practice cuts and youll do fine im sure . youll want to back cut it some not square cut . the sharper edge will shape in esily if your cut isnt perfect . id start at the top and cut the curve where it hooks over the other piece as thin as you can if not it will want to ride up on the first peice and when you push it down itll likely split . i usually do a big back cut so i have a real sharp mateing edge . if it isnt perfect i pull it back a little and snap it in firmly and the sharp edge will tighen right up . if you dont have room to do this such as an inside corner to another inside corner i force it over with a good stiff putty knife or 5 way tool from the other side . hope it helps . if you need any thing hollar and ill do what i can . as with any hand saw dont put pressure on your coping saw just pull it back and forth and steer it let the saw cut on its own pace . i set mine up to cut on the pull stroke .

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Dan Lyke

331 posts in 3875 days

posted 04-17-2008 11:47 PM

Thanks, especially for the encouragement to back-cut. I hadn’t thought about cutting a little bit wide but making it thin enough that that can bend the fibers on the edge. And, actually, that makes the whole cut easier because I don’t have to worry about keeping the cut square, just about following the front line.

Yeah, my coping saw is set to cut on the pull stroke, if I try the push stroke it compresses and pops the blade out.

Just patience, and I’ll make it happen.

Next challenge is finding the wood pore filler, but I think I’m just going to try to convince my sweety that we need to have a date night tonight and drive up to the Woodcraft, ‘cause they’re open late on Thursdays. Do I know romance, or what?

(Besides, that’ll give her another chance to ogle that new router table setup I’m wanting).

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/

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MRTRIM

744 posts in 3875 days

posted 04-18-2008 12:07 AM

you sure are smooth dan ! lol hollar if you need too

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